My heroes have always been cowboys, starting with my watching of Roy Rogers and The Rifleman on TV. To me, cowboys were rugged, do-what’s-right, self-sufficient, independent, clever, get-‘er-done-no-matter-what guys that lived by the code of the west and had the great outdoors for an office. John Wayne is still a mentor.

But, is the western lifestyle I love so much in danger? Wyoming is steeped in cowboy culture and mythology. But I wonder if the lure of a digital world, factory farms and ranches, trucks instead of horses, more money in other places and other draws, should cause concern over the potential loss of a rich legacy that Wyoming embodies.

 “Cheyenne Frontier Days is one of the biggest rodeos in the world. So you would think there would be more kids learning how to rope and ride, but there’s not.”

That hit me right in the feels. I love this country and think that cowboy/cowgirl mentality is one of the main ingredients in the success of our nation and is a mainstay of the American way.

I am not alone. My heroes were also an inspiration to the world. I’ve talked to many foreigners who come for CFD and confess their love of the American West and the mythology of cowboys and cowgirls. It is a legacy not just worthy of preserving, but of fostering and nurturing.

Anna’s report shined some light on a local non-profit that is hosting a 4 week series that will bring bull riding back to Cheyenne in March. Flying B Bull Riding is for kids aged 7 – 18 and is available to the kids of today who will be the adults of tomorrow. If supported, it will grow.

In 2017, Cheyenne Frontier Days added miniature bull riding to three of their main rodeos. The 6 young cowboys were no older than 12.

There are many rodeos around Wyoming and I hope that those, ranching and the lifestyle will continue for many years to come. It helps to have our support in attendance.

And of course..