am not often bothered or confused by the way my husband (a 4th generation Wyomingite) or my children talk.

The differences between Wisconsin accents (mine) and the Wyoming Drawl (theirs) are more often on my end, not theirs.

But I found myself in a great debate a few weeks ago over "creek" versus "crick".

My husband, children, and yes even my best friend say "crick" while I insist that it should be "creek." It's probably worth mentioning that I am the only non-native Wyomingite in the group.

I figured (per usual) that you would be happy to solve the problem for me with your opinions via Facebook, and I'm happy to see that I was correct.

According to my super scientific tally system, the official answer is "Crick" so yet again I am wrong...

But it was really close and for quite a while there Creek was ahead. In case you care the official tally (at the time this post was written) was "Crick" 33 and "Creek" 30 and of course we had plenty of listeners that claimed it was both.

Katie obviously has some kind of English degree with her answer "I have a crick in my neck from bending my neck while down at the creek." Great explanation and one I can get behind 100%.

Stan shared his strong feelings "A "crick" of course. Don't all y'all know nuttin?" and it made us all giggle just a bit when we read it.

But Jake gets the award for the funniest Facebook comment of all. "One must first ask, "do you have teeth or tooth?""

Valerie did all the dirty work for us and headed to Google. "If we were to bring Google into this....."One is a body of flowing freshwater smaller than a river, and the other is a pain in the neck. Unless you're from Appalachia, in which case the latter (crick) is an alternative pronunciation of the former (creek)" "

I love that she adds "However, I would always call a crick growing up 😂"

Justin got all scientific on us with "wider than your arm it’s a creek, smaller is a crick..."

In the end, I think we can all one hundred percent get behind Audrea's answer "I'm going fishing. Crick creek. Wherever."