Maybe next time just stick with a gift card.

Don't be surprised if that super cool gadget thingy you bought your nephew is currently on the Internet awaiting the highest bidder. As if Christmas shopping isn't hard enough, right? I've got nieces who are a part of Generation Z who I found very difficult to shop for. I'm not sure the things I loved as a teenager are still cool. My strategy was to buy them something practical and then supplement it with a Starbucks gift card.

They're too polite to ever tell me if I got it right or not.

That being said, I should't be surprised if those non-gift card presents end up on eBay. Why? Because according to a recent survey sponsored by Mercari, 30 percent of Generation Z (born between 1995-2015) will be selling their holiday gifts on their site or another one like it. This is a stark contrast to the nine percent of Baby Boomers who will be doing the same thing. In addition, 32 percent of Gen Z plan on re-gifting their presents.

While this sounds like a huge injustice, it's not uncommon and it's not unique to the generation. Although Gen Z accounts for most selling and re-gifting, another survey says 77 percent of gift receivers plan on returning a portion of their gifts to the store. That's a good chunk of people and it makes you wonder why we even do gifts in the first place if this is the result? Are we becoming more entitled or is there just little effort put forth these days because it's too much?

I, for one, will not be returning any of my gifts from this year. I just don't have the heart to do it. I will wear or use the gifts I've received, even if it's only in front of the person who gave them to me.

What are you doing with your gifts from the past year?