Smile, Cheyenne. A new study claims the Capital City is one of the "least miserable" places in the country.

Business Insider compared 1,000 metropolitan areas nationwide, judging each city with a "misery index" based on employment, income, commute times, access to health care, and the percent of the population living in poverty.

Of the 1,000 "most miserable cities" Cheyenne ranked 791st. The study claims nearly 11 percent of Cheyenne residents live under the poverty line and just over 10 percent don't have health insurance, both well below the national average. Cheyenne's average commute time of 14 minutes was also one of the shortest in the country. It also estimated that Cheyenne's population has grown by 7.4 percent since 2010.

Casper ranked 623rd on the misery index. Although just over 10 percent of Casper residents live below the poverty line, over 15 percent don't have health insurance. Like Cheyenne, Casper has one of the shorted commutes in the country, at 16.5 minutes. Casper's population has grown by 3.9 percent in the last decade.

Herriman, Utah, was ranked the least miserable city in America, with an average annual household income of over $94,000 and less than 3 percent of the population living below the poverty line. Four Texas towns, Leander, Little Elm, Frisco, and Kyle rounded out the five least miserable places.

Gary, Ind., with a 51 percent unemployment rate, an average annual household income of just over $29,000, and nearly 36 of the population living in poverty, finished first on the misery index, followed by Port Arthur, Tex., Detroit, Passaic, N.J., and Newark, N.J.