The new work climate for 2020 is drastically different than that of previous years due, mostly, to the impact of Covid:19. The funny thing is, people DO like working from home. No traffic, get that extra sleep, pants optional, where do I sign up? Ok, maybe there are drawbacks if you’re trying to work and your kid keeps asking you how to spell Mississippi. I get it.  

The good people at Zippia dug up some data on where the best place to work remotely per state. Here's how they break it down.  

Rent costs 

Home price 

Amount of laptops/desktops per household 

Broadband Internet access 

Amount of existing remote workers 

Our criteria can be broken down into two areas- affordability and feasibility. 

For affordability, we looked at median rent and home cost. Many cities with high paying jobs have costs of living, with sky-high rent and home costs outpacing incomes. Cities with affordable housing will be a draw for remote workers looking to cut their biggest expense. 

For feasibility, we examined the percent of homes with broadband internet and at least one laptop or desktop per household. When companies say their workers can work anywhere they mean anywhere with a strong internet connection. Cities with high technology and broadband rates will have a stronger infrastructure for remote workers to thrive. 

Finally, we looked at the current existing population of remote workers. The more remote workers, the more desirable the city is for remote cities to call home. 

They discovered the best place in Wyoming to do this, is Laramie. I mean, I’m sure they didn't take into consideration a rolling snow storm may knock out their internet or power, but, sure, I’ll go with that. Laramie is a cool town, and you could easily slum it out in a shop downtown.  

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