Just in time for Game 7 of the World Series tonight, here's a look back at Wyoming's greatest World Series moment, which took placed at a hospital a few miles away from Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati.

Casper native Tom Browning is one of only 23 pitchers to ever throw a perfect game in the big leagues. He is also the only player to ever leave the stadium during a World Series game, then get called back to the ballpark...on live television.

During the 8th inning of Game 2 in the 1990 World Series, the Cincinnati Reds lefty learned his wife Debbie had gone into labor in the stands and was being rushed from Riverfront Stadium to a nearby hospital. Not expecting to pitch, Browning left to witness the birth of his child.

"She didn't want me to leave the game, but I panicked. I wasn't going to let her go alone," Browning later told the Los Angeles Times.

While he rushed to the maternity ward, still in uniform, the game had gone into extra innings. Reds manager Lou Piniella wasn't aware that Browning was gone until he called for him to warm up in the bullpen. Incensed, "Sweet Lou" sent word to the broadcast booth, asking the announcers to put out an urgent call for Browning to return.

When he arrived at the hospital, Browning turned on the television and heard the message. As he frantically called for a ride back to the game, the Reds scored the winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning. 30 minutes later, Browning was in the delivery room when his wife delivered their son.

The next day, Browning was back on the mound. He started Game 3, pitching six innings and picking up the win in an 8-3 Reds blowout. Cincinnati went on the sweep the Oakland Athletics.

Browning spent 12 seasons in the majors and was named to the 1991 National League All-Star team. He is one of 15 Wyoming natives who have represented the Cowboy State in the big leagues. 39 players from the University of Wyoming also made it to the show.

Browning and fellow Casper native Mike Deveroux are Wyoming's only World Series champions. Deveroux won two rings with the 1988 Los Angeles Dodgers and the 1995 Atlanta Braves and also earned MVP honors in the '95 National League Championship Series.